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Good bye Sikkim

The last full day

sunny 20 °C

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This will be our last full day in Sikkim, it’s been quite a ride, from the cold discomfort of the Jungle Cottages, to the scariest road trips, and finally a little piece of paradise. I’ve enjoyed everything, so why did I decide to come here, I read an article about Sikkim being the wholly organic State in India. And during my last visit to this part of the S Asia I only saw the tip of Everest, so I hoped we’d see more of the range. That may not have gone quite according to plan, but I was seduced by the description of the Jungle Cottages!
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One of results of the transformation to organic agriculture is that more of the food products are grown locally. It also means that restaurants in Gangtok for instance cannot buy produce from outside the state sometimes pushing up prices. But for places like Turek Kothi it allows them to be self sufficient in most products.
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Turuk Kothi was home to the revered and admired, Laxmi Das Pradhan, first minter of Sikkim. Even after over 160 years, the descendants of Laxmi Das Pradhan continue to live in the same house. Today, Shri Hirendra Pradhan (the fifth descendent of Laxmi Das Pradhan)
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The story dates back to the year 1848; when a Newar Tradesman, (Newari’s originate from Nepal). Laxmi Das Pradhan undertook a visionary endeavour of introducing the first ever coinage system in this quaint little kingdom under the reign of Maharaja Thutob Namgyal, where barter system was still prevalent for economic exchanges. Laxmi Das Pradhan initiated the minting of copper coins namely, Dheba paisa and Cheptey paisa. With the permission from the then Maharaja, Laxmidas Pradhan along with his brother, Chandravir Pradhan acquired mining lease of copper mines in places like Tuk-khani in South Sikkim and Pachey-khani (mine), East Sikkim.
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Large tracts of uncultivated land were cleared for this purpose; the Taksaris (owner of the minting houses) played a crucial role in strengthening the Sikkimese economy during the late 19th and early 20th century. They can be accredited with the migration of large number of Nepalese people of different origins to work at the copper deposits at Pacheykhani, Bhotangkhani, and Tukkhani, and also to cultivate the barren lands of Sikkim.Turuk Kothi is the home to the first minter of Sikkim, and it also served as a district headquarter for many years. Over time, the Taksaris were conferred the title of 'Rai Sahibs' who would serve as subordinates to the Sikkimese monarchs. Within the estate, a settlement house known as 'Kuccheri' was also established for settling various disputes among the subjects in the vicinity. Additionally, the Kuccheri also had a prison for the culprits. A remarkable aspect about the estate is the fact that, centuries after; Turuk Kothi stands unaltered even today, as had been built by its first resident.
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Turuk Kothi was home to the revered and admired, Laxmi Das Pradhan, first minter of Sikkim. Even after over 160 years, the descendants of Laxmi Das Pradhan continue to live in the same house. Today, Shri Hirendra Pradhan (the fifth descendent of Laxmi Das Pradhan).
large_25FE9523-90C7-4436-8806-832790D6B699.jpeg
The story dates back to the year 1848; when a Newar Tradesman, (Newari’s originate from Nepal). Laxmi Das Pradhan undertook a visionary endeavour of introducing the first ever coinage system in this quaint little kingdom under the reign of Maharaja Thutob Namgyal, where barter system was still prevalent for economic exchanges. Laxmi Das Pradhan initiated the minting of copper coins namely, Dheba paisa and Cheptey paisa. With the permission from the then Maharaja, Laxmidas Pradhan along with his brother, Chandravir Pradhan acquired mining lease of copper mines in places like Tuk-khani in South Sikkim and Pachey-khani (mine), East Sikkim.
large_F957DBF9-646F-4594-9CE4-81D2D7EA48BE.jpeg
Large tracts of uncultivated land were cleared for this purpose; the Taksaris (owner of the minting houses) played a crucial role in strengthening the Sikkimese economy during the late 19th and early 20th century. They can be accredited with the migration of large number of Nepalese people of different origins to work at the copper deposits at Pacheykhani, Bhotangkhani, and Tukkhani, and also to cultivate the barren lands of Sikkim.Turuk Kothi is the home to the first minter of Sikkim, and it also served as a district headquarter for many years. Over time, the Taksaris were conferred the title of 'Rai Sahibs' who would serve as subordinates to the Sikkimese monarchs. Within the estate, a settlement house known as 'Kuccheri' was also established for settling various disputes among the subjects in the vicinity. Additionally, the Kuccheri also had a prison for the culprits. A remarkable aspect about the estate is the fact that, centuries after; Turuk Kothi stands unaltered even today, as had been built by its first resident.
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Until the rise of the Gurkhas in 1768, Nepalese coins were in circulation in Tibet and Bhutan. It’s not certain whether Newar coins were also in circulation in those days. But, the practice of receiving the Tibetan or Indian coins had never been objected to by the rulers of Sikkim; rather they used to accept revenues in these coins from the people residing in the border areas.

Life is good
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Breakfast 21 March
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Breakfast 22 March
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Supper 22 March
Breakfast 23 March
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And so on to Delhi

Posted by khaimah2019 02:10 Archived in India Tagged buildings people sites historical

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